Jupiter Double Shadow Transit with iPhone

5 Jun

Here is the view through my Celestron NexStar 8SE telescope from Saturday, June 3, 2017. Over the course of about two hours I captured the shadows of the moons Ganymede (top) and Io (bottom) as they crossed Jupiter’s disk. These images were taken with my iPhone 6 using this method.

jupiter-shadow-transit

You can also see the moons themselves to the right of the planet. Ganymede is visible at top right, Io appears at the edge of the disk about halfway through the animation, and Callisto is faintly visible at bottom right. Europa couldn’t make it to the party and I attempted no photography there…

 

 

The Solar System with iPhone

13 Mar

I’ve been photographing the night sky through my telescope with my iPhone since 2011, but two objects have eluded me: Uranus and Neptune. Finally, in early 2017, I was able to capture them both. As a result, I’ve been able to assemble my first complete iPhone astrophotography solar system collage!

SolarSystem2017_Watermark

All planets in the above image were taken with an iPhone 6 or iPhone 4S through my Celestron NexStar 8SE telescope. The image of the sun is a composite image made from two photos taken with my iPhone 4S through my Coronado PST solar (H-alpha) telescope.

All images were photographed and edited using the techniques described in my Smartphone Astrophotography blog post, and many of the original individual images can be found on my Flickr account.

Photo Details:

Sun & Prominence, May 19, 2012
Composite image taken with iPhone 4S through Coronado PST H-alpha solar telescope.

Mercury, May 24, 2014
My first telescopic photo of tiny Mercury. Stack of 26 frames taken with iPhone 4S attached to NexStar 8SE telescope.

Venus, July 2, 2015
Stack of 51 frames taken with iPhone 6 through 8″ telescope. Processed in Registax, Nebulosity, Gimp & Flickr.

Mars, June 24, 2016
Stack of 1200 frames with iPhone through NexStar 8 SE telescope. Stacked & edited in PIPP, Autostakkert, Registax, Nebulosity & Gimp.

Jupiter & Double Moon Shadow Transit, March 22, 2016
Includes Great Red Spot and shadows of moons Io & Europa. Stack of 700+ frames taken with iPhone 6 through 8″ telescope.

Uranus, Feb 26, 2017
Stack of 150 iPhone 6 video frames taken with the NightCapPro app through 8″ telescope.

Neptune, Jan 2, 2017
Stack of 5 single images taken with iPhone 6 using the NightCapPro app through 8″ telescope.

Let me know what you think in the comments and feel free to reach out to me via Twitter @FailedProtostar!

 

My first photo of Neptune!

5 Jan

On Monday night, I captured my first-ever photo of Neptune using my iPhone and 8″ telescope. This is a single, unedited 6 second exposure using the NightCap Pro app for iPhone.  It may not look like much, but Neptune was 4.5 BILLION kilometres away when I took this!

neptune

Now, the only planet I haven’t photographed is Uranus, so I’ll need to get on that and complete a full solar system collage in 2017.

Six Years of Saturn

8 Nov

Here’s a snapshot of how Saturn’s tilt has changed (from Earth’s perspective) through its long (29-year) orbit around the sun over the past few years as seen through my telescope.

saturncollage

Photo details: 
April 30, 2011: Single image, handheld digital camera through 5″ telescope.
June 23, 2012: Saturn, June 23, 2012. Stack of 70 frames in Registax from iPhone 4S video taken through NexStar 8SE telescope.
May 3, 2013: Stack of 10 frames from iPhone 4s video through NexStar 8SE telescope.
June 1, 2014: Stack of 200 frames from iPhone 4s video through NexStar 8SE telescope.
May 28, 2015: Stack of 300+ frames from iPhone 6 video through NexStar 8SE telescope.
June 6, 2016: Stack of ~1000 frames taken with iPhone 6 through Celestron NexStar 8SE telescope.

Jupiter & Moons with iPhone

2 May

Here is a GIF of two images (each a stack of 300+ frames) taken with my iPhone attached to a Celestron NexStar8SE telescope on the night of April 29, 2016.

JupiterGIFoutput_rlnTHt

These images were taken about 20 minutes apart and show the movement of Europa (left), Io’s shadow, and Io (right) along with the Great Red Spot.

For information on how I take these images with my iPhone, please see my post on Smartphone Astrophotography.

Full Christmas Moon with iPhone

3 Jan

December 25th saw the first Christmas Day full moon since 1977, and I was able to capture it with my iPhone 6 attached to an 8″ telescope. Despite horribly cloudy weather through December and January so far, we had two clear nights in a row (December 24th and 25th) which allowed me to take the telescope out for a spin.

December25FullMoonChristmas

This is a stacked image of 50+ frames taken with iPhone video through a Celestron NexStar 8SE telescope on the night of December 25, 2015 when the moon was just past full in Ottawa, Canada.

I took two separate videos of the moon (one of the top portion, and one of the bottom portion) with the FiLMiC Pro iPhone app because the entire moon could not fit in the video frame. I merged and rotated the stacked images from those two videos in Photoshop, and then edited them for sharpness and clarity using the iPhone apps Camera+ and SnapSeed.

You can see more of my smartphone astrophotography on Flickr.

 

 

 

 

Hadley Rille with iPhone

31 Jul

For *years* I’ve been trying to photograph Hadley Rille — a long, meandering channel on the moon visited by the Apollo 15 astronauts in 1971.

Apollo15HadleyCrop

Apollo 15 astronaut Dave Scott attends to the Lunar Roving Vehicle (LRV) at the edge of Hadley Rille, August 2, 1971.

It turns out I’d captured it in 2012 with my iPhone 4S…and not even known it!

HadleyGIFSymeswatermark

Hadley Rille, stack of 30 frames from iPhone 4S video attached to an 8″ telescope. October 23, 2012.

Above is a zoomed-in GIF that shows what I’ve long sought to photograph! The highlighted area is the winding channel known as Hadley Rille or Rima Hadley. In October, 2012, I was able to spot the rille with my eye at the telescope, so I took a 30-second video of the region with my iPhone 4S to see if I could record it. At the time, I couldn’t see any hints of it in the video or its individual frames, so I assumed it was too small to be picked up by the smartphone camera.

Three years later, armed with much more experience stacking and sharpening video frames, I returned to the video and was amazed to discover that the smartphone camera definitely picked up the rille! While the chasm is long, it only measures 1km across and 300m deep, on average, so it’s amazing to think that a smartphone camera attached to a modest telescope can capture something that small from 380,000 kilometres away.

My photo doesn’t appear to have captured *all* of the rille, however. Hadley rille continues further North than my photo shows. In fact, I was disappointed when I saw that the specific section of the rille visited by the Apollo astronauts isn’t visible in this photo — possibly due to the way it was lit at the time of the photo. It *should* be possible for me to capture the entire channel under the right conditions, however, so it looks like I have something else to try for on an upcoming moon shoot.

Below is my full-size image of the region. It’s a composite of 30 iPhone video frames which have been “stacked” together and sharpened using various software tools that include Registax and GIMP.

HadleyRilleWideCropWatermark

Imbrium basin & site of Apollo 15 landing. Stack of 30 frames from iPhone 4S video attached to an 8″ telescope. October 23, 2012.

To see more of my smartphone astrophotography, follow me on Twitter, Instagram, or Flickr!